Finding Alcatrazes and early Luso-African settlement on Santiago Island, Cape Verde

Christopher Evans, Marie Louise Stig Sørensen, Michael J. Allen, Jo Appleby, Tania Manuel Casimiro, Charles French, Sarah Inskip, Jose Lima, Richard Newman, Konstanin Richter & Rob Scaife

Abstract

Abstract image

After the Portuguese discovered the Cape Verde Islands in AD 1456 they divided its main island, Santiago, into two governing captaincies. The founding settlement in the south-west, Cidade Velha, soon became the Islands’ capital and a thriving trade centre; in contrast, that in the east, Alcatrazes, only lasted as an official seat from 1484–1516 and is held to have ‘failed’ (see Richter 2015).


Authors

  • Christopher Evans
    Division of Archaeology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3DZ, UK
  • Marie Louise Stig Sørensen
    Division of Archaeology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3DZ, UK
  • Michael J. Allen
    Allen Environmental Archaeology, Redroof, Green Road, Codford St Peter, Warminster BA12 0NW, UK
  • Jo Appleby
    Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
  • Tania Manuel Casimiro
    Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida de Berna 26 C, 1069-061 Lisboa, Portugal
  • Charles French
    Division of Archaeology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3DZ, UK
  • Sarah Inskip
    Division of Archaeology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3DZ, UK
  • Jose Lima
    Instituto do Património Cultural, Ministerio da Cultura, Praia, Cabo Verde
  • Richard Newman
    Division of Archaeology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3DZ, UK
  • Konstanin Richter
    Independent researcher, Dorfstraße 21, 26441 Jever, Germany
  • Rob Scaife
    Palaeoenvironmental Laboratory, Geography and Environment, University of Southampton, University Road, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK
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